It’s A Silent Rooftop Turbine Which Could Produce Half Of Your Home’s Energy Needs

Archimedes Wind Turbinne

The Thing About These Archimedes Screw Turbines Is They Are So Mesmerizing To Watch.

This type of turbines blade has solved the noise problem these small household turbines have been known for.

The Archimedes is a Dutch renewable energy company that specializes in these small household wind turbines.

They claim this Liam F1 wind turbine can generate 1500 kWh of energy a year starting at wind speeds of only 5 m/s. (spec sheet on page 4)

When used in combination with rooftop solar panels, a house could run off grid. “When there is wind you use the energy produced by the wind turbine; when the sun is shining you use the solar cells to produce the energy,” The Archimedes CEO Richard Ruijtenbeek said.

The Liam’s blades are shaped like a Nautilus shell. The design allows it to point into the wind to capture the most amount of energy, while also producing very little sound. The inventor of the turbine Marinus Mieremet says that the power output is 80 percent of the theoretical maximum energy that could be harnessed from the wind.

“Generally speaking, there is a difference in pressure in front and behind of the rotor blades of a windmill. However, this is not the case with the Liam F1. The difference in pressure is created by the spatial figure in the spiral blade. This results in a much better performance. Even when the wind is blowing at an angle of 60 degrees into the rotor, it will start to spin.

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The video on the next page gives you some interesting history of this turbine.

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39 Responses to “It’s A Silent Rooftop Turbine Which Could Produce Half Of Your Home’s Energy Needs”

  1. Cynthia

    Mar 25. 2015

    i would love to have this on top of my motorhome. I believe in wind power and solor power and staying off the grid thank you for sharing
    Cynthia Travers

    Reply to this comment
    • Carmen Marranco

      Apr 16. 2015

      Where can these be purchased and do they work with the USA power requirements?

      Reply to this comment
  2. Jim Wilson

    Mar 26. 2015

    The product is super cool, but the video is terrible! Can you just show how it works without all the rock n’ roll theatrics?

    Reply to this comment
    • gary

      Mar 29. 2015

      Agreed with your comments. Best to watch on MUTE! Really very little information here.
      Does look very interesting however.

      Reply to this comment
    • Deb Boz

      Apr 05. 2015

      TOTALLY agree with the statement re the video. Who would ever know how quiet the turbine is? I stopped watching @ 2:38, just couldn’t take anymore. The music brings to mind a poorly-produced sports show. Too bad, because I’m interested in the product.

      Reply to this comment
  3. Dellas Keeling

    Mar 26. 2015

    This is very neat, what are the costs for the various sizes and the outputs for each blade size and wind speeds. The article and video is very interesting but I did not see that information. Thank you for your input on this.

    Reply to this comment
  4. tina_dunkel@yahoo.com

    Mar 28. 2015

    I’m tina I. The USA an would love more info we get some crazy wind an this is the coolest idea so far is there a way to do testing over here an use on a home

    Reply to this comment
  5. Bored Onlooked

    Mar 29. 2015

    Wow, at a price tag of $5450 usd it only take a little over 24 years for this thing to pay for itself. I’d be crazy NOT to buy one of these things!*

    Reply to this comment
    • RB

      Apr 05. 2015

      If your only decision for using alternative energy sources is the ROI, I think you miss the point. My main reason is to be as independent as possible from traditional utility providers, especially when they go down (for whatever reason).

      Reply to this comment
    • G.Scott

      Apr 06. 2015

      where did you find the price?

      Reply to this comment
    • Simple Arithmetic

      Apr 07. 2015

      Here in Alaska we have limited access to sunlight in the winter but ample wind available year-round. In the Matanuska-Susitna Borough electricity bills can run between $100-200 every month depending on home size, and is much more expensive in the villages, if available at all. This turbine, less the expense of a battery bank, could feasibly pay for itself in 5 years.

      Reply to this comment
    • Mark

      Jun 23. 2015

      So you have an $18 electric bill per month?… yeah right!

      Reply to this comment
    • jeff

      Jan 13. 2016

      your electic bill is only 23 dlollars

      Reply to this comment
  6. hey

    Mar 31. 2015

    How would I go about making one of these myself.?

    Reply to this comment
  7. Gary Schwartz

    Apr 01. 2015

    I want several and living on Long Island, it’s always windy! Better than solar!

    Reply to this comment
  8. Jason

    Apr 07. 2015

    I would like to know how much this costs and how the energy is stored.

    Reply to this comment
  9. Charles

    Apr 08. 2015

    Another solution presented by people who flunked physics 101.

    – But that’s OK, because there’s a green sucker born every minute.

    Reply to this comment
    • Sage

      Apr 09. 2015

      The first coherent comment I’ve read about this device!

      Their claim for producing half of a household’s electrical needs is quite a claim. I would like to see 3rd party independent testing results if this is really true.

      Yes, this artsy Archimedes screw looks really cool, but don’t get snowed by their hype and false claims. I can tell right off the bat there would be a lot of ‘wind friction’ that would slow down the rotation and create noise in high winds.

      The solution? A rooftop-mounted concept called the ‘Ridgeblade’, that is now combined with the technology of the Gorlov/Darrieus wind turbine.

      The idea being that the roof acts like a wind scoop, channeling more concentrated wind towards the Ridgeblade.

      Now replace the Ridgeblade turbine with a horizontal Gorlov/Darrieus turbine instead, and automatically make this system much more efficient, more power output, and more quiet than anything else in its class.

      This is because with the Gorlov turbine, the blades get PULLED around by the wind, and not pushed! Yes, the aerodynamic shape of these helical blades create a LIFT!

      Nothing else comes close for wind-powered efficiency and quiet operation…right on the ridge of your roof! Take a gander:

      http://tinyurl.com/majjkz2

      Reply to this comment
      • Unique

        Jun 16. 2015

        Hi, are you an engineer?

        Reply to this comment
      • Elijah

        Jun 17. 2015

        As someone who knows the developer/inventor of this turbine personally, I have to refute your comment. He’s an incredible man, and one of the most esteemed inventors in Holland.

        The device itself is also streamline to near perfection, %57-%58 efficient if I’m not mistaken. Which is damn near remarkable considering most of the wind turbines on the market struggle for %29.

        The turbine itself is also compact, this was to avoid ‘stepping on the wrong toes’ so to speak. However, with that said, plans for the future include full scale turbines.

        As for your ‘noise’, there is none. All you have to do is view the live tests, which have been running for almost 2 years now… As for friction, I assume you’re referring to ‘drag’, the amount of electricity/power needed to ‘push’ through the wind. In this field you would also be completely mistaken. The reason the device IS so efficient is because it has more or less REMOVED drag from the equation. A feat that almost cost him his place within inventing circles because of other inventors saying that it was impossible…

        Needless to say, I would highly recommend researching a device and understanding it more thoroughly before you go around slandering it, all the while offering some sub-par device as an alternative.

        Your Sincerely,
        Elijah Solomon Olig

        Reply to this comment
  10. Buster

    Apr 09. 2015

    Off the grid, funny! How do the combination of this and a solar panels work at night, with no wind just after an ice storm? Until they develop better batteries (or release the technology that powers that huge flying triangle) this stuff will just be fun to look at!

    Reply to this comment
  11. Nick

    Apr 11. 2015

    Something doesn’t seem right, given mass and momentum elements of the design. Although having seen the impact on birds of the big wind turbine fans, this would help solve that issue.

    Reply to this comment
  12. rusty

    Apr 12. 2015

    PLEASE do a small amount of research before you put your money into ideas like this.
    Unless you just have extra money to throw away.
    A “drag” type when machine will never be cost efficient.

    Reply to this comment
    • Elijah

      Jun 17. 2015

      As someone who knows the developer/inventor of this turbine personally, I have to refute your comment. He’s an incredible man, and one of the most esteemed inventors in Holland.

      The device itself is also streamline to near perfection, %57-%58 efficient if I’m not mistaken. Which is damn near remarkable considering most of the wind turbines on the market struggle for %29.

      The turbine itself is also compact, this was to avoid ‘stepping on the wrong toes’ so to speak. However, with that said, plans for the future include full scale turbines.

      When referring to ‘drag’, I assume you mean the amount of electricity/power needed to ‘push’ through the wind. In this you would be completely mistaken. The reason the device IS so efficient is because it has more or less REMOVED drag from the equation. A feat that almost cost him his place within inventing circles because of other inventors saying that it was impossible…

      Needless to say, I would highly recommend researching a device and understanding it more thoroughly before you go around slandering it, all the while offering some sub-par device as an alternative.

      Your Sincerely,
      Elijah Solomon Olig

      Reply to this comment
      • Larry Dobson

        Feb 16. 2016

        Since you seem to understand the physics of fluid dynamics as applied to wind turbines, I have experimented with a wind turbine design many of you may be interested in building yourself. It is based on the geometry of the involute spiral, which provides a NON-CONSTRICTING pathway into the center of the turbine (in effect a venturi, the opposite of blade turbines, which throw the wind out in turbulent fashion), and out the low-pressure side, providing both lift and push (not drag, but accelerating push) on both sides of very large surface-area vanes. The wind uses the entire 3D depth of the turbine, unlike the flat plane of an airfoil blade (which is the basis of the Betz Law limiting wind-turbine efficiency to 59%) Wind flow is laminar (not turbulent, which reduces efficiency), exiting in a smooth stream at about 200 degrees from the incoming wind direction. It is silent, efficient, beautiful, and can be fabricated cheaply by a skilled craftsman. Further analysis and detailed plans are available on my webpage: http://fundamentalform.com/html/involute_wind_turbine.html

        Reply to this comment
  13. Scott

    Apr 21. 2015

    intwresting concept but I have to agree with most of the comments. Not very practical or feasible.

    Reply to this comment
  14. Bruce

    Apr 26. 2015

    I am skeptical about “half of a household’s power.” My power bills are 30/month in the states. At 9% interest, a $5000 generator costs $450/year to finance, if we assume no repairs and no breakdown. Not so useful for me even it replaces my last dollar of power somehow (like by a sale-back of excess, etc.) But I agree there are people for whom this would be very useful as a back-up or supplement.

    Reply to this comment
  15. Dawn

    May 13. 2015

    I have a grid intergrated PV solar array, was wondering if this could be added to my existing system? I have a DC converter & AC inverter, with net metering system. Can you advise?

    Reply to this comment
  16. Richard Miller

    May 30. 2015

    I would love to have one ! Im so tired of them crooks AEP!

    Reply to this comment
  17. kamisama

    Jun 08. 2015

    not worth$5,000

    Reply to this comment
  18. Kirk Simon

    Jun 08. 2015

    Thank You for sharing the article. Yeah, it’s really a great energy solution. Turbines are really a great solution. Like turbines many big Hybrid generators are there to provide solutions for energy.

    Reply to this comment
  19. kim

    Jun 13. 2015

    i wont one, i wish they could start a project that would return soms money they invested and by that they could giive some away for free,

    Reply to this comment
  20. Aviv

    Jun 17. 2015

    Did any of you actually read the specs on page 4 because the author CLEARLY did not.

    The MAXIMUM power output of this is 1.5 kW, and it doesn’t produce this at 5 m/s (they have it written as ms^-1…for those of you who aren’t math-savvy, raising a number to a negative power means to take the inverse of that number then perform the exponent. So 2^-2 would equal [1/2]^2= 1/4.). At 5 m/s (roughly 2.2 mph) you generate 1/2 kW. At 15 m/s it produces the max

    Reply to this comment
  21. Harry Testoni

    Jun 18. 2015

    Would be nice if the music was left out….I was interested in watching the video…..if i want to listen to music i will play my own music… other than that it was very informative.

    Reply to this comment
  22. Imperceptus

    Jun 18. 2015

    Article writer sucks at math. Average US household uses approximately 10,000 kWh per year. The article claims the turbine can produce 1,500 kWh per year. That’s 15%, not half, of a household’s needs.

    Reply to this comment
  23. Randy Dawson

    Jun 23. 2015

    Very interested…need more information.

    Reply to this comment
  24. sucha Mann

    Jan 17. 2016

    High Efficiency (80% of theoretical possible to harness from the wind), silent, and small size. It would be good to have some cost analysis, and size+wind space requirement for a house holder to see how practical it would be, + PV panels to go off the grid with a comparative study to purchase/install it. This would be good to manufacture locally under license and withstand the climate change. As they say in Punjabi: ਵਾਹ ਬਈ ਵਾਹ: Wah By Wah: – keep up the good work to bring out practical solutions to make Mother Earth Friendly 2016.

    Reply to this comment

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